Syllabus: Pastry and Baking Program - LAP - Breads & Breakfast Pastries | The French Pastry School

Syllabus: Pastry and Baking Program - LAP - Breads & Breakfast Pastries

LAP - Breads & Breakfast Pastries

Course Description:

This course module introduces students to the science of the ingredients of pastry and baking, and the practice of creating a variety of baked goods through use of the latest mixing techniques and cost-effective production methods. Students delve deeply into baking technology in this course, learning the different types of flours, sugars, and yeast, and how the interactions of these ingredients affect the outcome in leavened, unleavened, and laminated products. This course provides instruction in classic European recipes and new ones. Students learn how to make a levain or bread starter; how to take temperatures of all various elements used in bread making; how to properly mix; how to produce yeast doughs using direct sponges and levain sponges; how to properly allow the breads to ferment through proofing; and how to shape and bake. Students also learn about oven technology and different types of ovens.


Students the Course is Expected to Serve:

This course is a necessary component to completing the 24-week L’Art de la Pâtisserie – The Professional Pastry and Baking Program.


Pre-requisites and Co-requisites:

Pre-requisites for this course include Food Service Safety & Sanitation and Food Service Theory & Basic Skills, or consent of the Dean for Student Affairs. Co-requisites include Sugar Confectionery, Chocolate Confectionery, Ice Cream & Sorbet, Plated Desserts, Chocolate & Sugar Decoration & Sculpture, French Cakes & Tarts, Petits Fours & Miniature Pastries, Celebration Cake Making & Decorating, and the Capstone Course: Final Buffet.


Training Objectives:

  • The student will learn the fundamental interaction chemistry of the ingredients used in creating baked products.
  • The student will learn the different types of flours, sugars, and yeast, and how the interaction of these ingredients affects the outcome in leavened, unleavened, and laminated products.
  • The student will learn classic European recipes (e.g., croissant, brioche, beignet) and new American/European recipes (e.g., blueberry muffins, Danishes).
  • The student will learn how to make and shape a wide variety of breakfast pastries, using the latest mixing techniques and cost-effective production methods.
  • The student will learn how to produce yeast doughs using direct sponges and levain sponges.
  • The student will learn how to make laminated doughs.
  • The student will learn how to make a levain or bread starter; how to take temperatures of all various elements used in bread making; how to properly mix; how to properly allow the breads to ferment through proofing; and how to shape and bake.
  • The student will learn about oven technology and the different types of ovens.


Student Learning Outcomes:

  • The student will explain the fundamental interaction chemistry of the ingredients used in creating baked products.
  • The student will discriminate among the different types of flours, sugars, and yeast and explain how the interaction of these ingredients affects the outcome in leavened, unleavened, and laminated dough products.
  • The student will identify and explain the compositions of classic and new European as well as American recipes for breads and breakfast pastries.
  • The student will produce yeast doughs using direct sponges and levain sponges.
  • The student will produce laminated doughs.
  • The student will make a levain or bread starter.
  • The student will demonstrate accuracy in measuring temperatures of the ingredients used in breakfast pastry and bread making; an ability to mix ingredients and proof properly; and proficiency in shaping as well as baking doughs to create saleable products.
  • The student will explain oven technology and discriminate among different types of ovens.


Course Outline:

  • The foundation of breakfast pastries, mixing methods, and laminated doughs. (7 hours lecture; 30 hours lab).
  • The foundation of breads, starters, pre-ferments, shaping methods, and the use of different flours. (7 hours lecture; 31 hours lab)


Methods of Instruction*:

  • Lectures
  • Whole-group discussions facilitated by the chef instructor
  • Technique and recipe demonstrations by the chef instructor
  • Chef instructor-supervised production of recipes by students


Methods of Evaluation*:

  • Appropriate and accurate responses to instructor’s questions during demonstrations and class discussions
  • Chef instructor observations during recipe production
  • Practical examination of key course recipes

 

*Further explanation of the Methods of Instruction and Evaluation across the program may be found in the Catalog.